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Welcome

The Department of Communication is a national leader in the study of communication as a social science, ranked among the top five in a recent poll by the National Research Council. Our faculty and students are dedicated to understanding the role and enhancing the effectiveness of communication processes, systems, and infrastructure in society. We explore communication in its many forms and contexts as a fundamentally social phenomenon. Our faculty members are recognized for developing and applying novel theoretical perspectives to the most pressing social and policy issues of the day.  

Alumni/Undergraduate Student Connections

In January, Christopher Byrne led ten Comm students to Silicon Valley to visit alumni in various tech companies. In preparation for the trip, students took part in Christopher's SILICOMM seminar, where they researched the participating alumni and companies. Students visited Stanford University’s VR Lab, ShareThis, Mozilla, Google, Facebook, Apple, and Intel. Personnel from each company offered valuable insights into their workdays, providing students an inside understanding of their companies and industries. Thank you to the alumni who shared their time and those who funded the trip.

 

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Faculty in the News

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Job Posting: Visiting Lecturer in Risk/Science Comm

Apr 18, 2019

Visiting Lecturer
Risk and Science Communication
Department of Communication
Cornell University

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS)
100 % Teaching, Non-Tenure Track, 9 month appointment
2-Year Appointment to begin July 1, 2019 
Cornell University – Mann Library Building
Ithaca, New York

Position Function:

The Department of Communication at Cornell University is seeking a visiting lecturer to teach undergraduate-level courses in risk and science communication, including science writing. Candidates who could also teach courses in analysis of public opinion, public policy communication, environmental communication, or communication law are particularly encouraged to apply. 

The position involves 100% teaching responsibilities at the undergraduate level. This will involve teaching 4 courses per academic year, including preparing course materials, grading, and maintaining office hours. 

Cornell’s Department of Communication is a national leader in the study of communication as a social science. Our faculty and students are dedicated to understanding the role and enhancing the effectiveness of communication processes, systems, and infrastructure in society.

Anticipated Division of Time:

100 % - Teach 4 undergraduate courses per academic year, which will be a combination drawn from the following list:
Comm 3020 – Science Writing (3 credits)
Comm 4860 – Risk Communication (3 credits)
Comm 3210 – Communication and the Environment (3 credits)
Comm 4200 – Public Opinion and Social Processes (3 credits)
Comm 4280 – Communication Law (3 credits)

Requirements:
• Ph.D. in Communication or a closely aligned field 
• Experience in teaching undergraduate courses in the areas of risk and/or science communication

Supervision Exercised:
The position will involve the supervision of undergraduate and graduate teaching assistants.
Interested applicants should submit: (1) curriculum vitae, (2) letter of interest, including a brief description of how this position relates to their career plans, (3) statement of contribution to diversity, equity, and inclusion, and (4) names and contact information of three references to https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/13582.

Diversity and Inclusion are a part of Cornell University’s heritage. We are a recognized employer and educator valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities.

Sahara Byrne promoted to Full Professor

May 17, 2019

Congratulations to Professor Sahara Byrne on her promotion!

Neil Lewis Jr. publishes "Modeling gender counter-stereotypic group behavior: a brief video intervention reduces participation gender gaps on STEM teams" in Social Psychology of Education

Apr 13, 2019

Neil Lewis Jr.'s newest article "Modeling gender counter-stereotypic group behavior: a brief video intervention reduces participation gender gaps on STEM teams" was just published in Social Psychology of Education. The article reports the results of a group-level (rather than individual-level) intervention that was able to reduce gender gaps in participation on teams of STEM students who were working together on group projects. The results underscore the importance of all parties on teams (and in organizations) working together to achieve equity, or as Neil and collaborators concluded in the paper "to reduce gaps and disparities in outcomes it may not be enough to show women high-achieving role models and encourage them to speak up (or lean in); it may also require men to actively support those efforts--to step back and make room." Read more

Faculty win $40,000 Engaged Cornell Grant

Apr 2, 2019


Neil Lewis Jr., Sahara ByrneAmelia Greiner Safi, Andrea Stevenson WonJeff Niederdeppe & Jon Schuldt won a $40,000 grant for faculty research on engagement from Engaged Cornell. Their project is entitled, "Are Mobile Research Laboratories Effective Vehicles for Engaging Underrepresented Populations in Social Scientific Research?"

Their goal is to assess how using the Cornell Mobile Research Lab affects scientific engagement among participants from groups typically underrepresented in social scientific research and how using this innovative technology to conduct research with minority communities affects perceptions and practices of researchers. They will survey participants in mobile lab studies to assess their engagement and also conduct qualitative interviews with researchers to examine how using the mobile lab affects their perceptions and research practices. Studying engagement in this bi-directional way will enable them to learn more about which research methods and questions foster (or undermine) scientific engagement and trust; that data can help us to (a) advance knowledge about community engaged research processes, and (b) give community members a greater voice in shaping future research practices.

Dean Boor's comments on the new home of the Department of Communication during the Official Dedication on April 8, 2016.